A No No… No?

It was May 26, 1959 when the Pirates southpaw Harvey Haddix took the hill against the Braves. Who would have thought it would be a game for the record books, only to years later be a game for the scrapbooks. You see it was an unusual day at the ballpark, one which took 13 innings to settle. Throughout those 13 innings Harvey Haddix had retired 36 straight batters, not letting a single Braves player reach base, a feat no doubt that will never be replicated in today’s modern game.

Then in the bottom half of the 13th the Braves leadoff man reached on an error and that is when things starting to get grim for Haddix. There was a sacrifice bunt and an intentional walk to move the runners to 1st and 2nd. The next batter hit a ball out to right center which was hard to tell in the whether if it had left the yard or not, but it indeed did. Controversy then reared its ugly head when the runner on first a guy who’s name you might have heard before – Hammerin’ Hank Aaron was passed by Joe Adcock, the batter who had just left the yard – this resulted in the homerun ending up a double, but little did that debacle matter as Harvey Haddix’s no no was over.

harveyhaddix

It wasn’t until 1991 when Major League baseball changed the rules a bit to strike Haddix’s pitching performance from the record books, it was ruled a pitcher had to finish the game with a win and not allow a hit for it to go down in the books as a no hitter. It’s interesting to know that some of Harvey Haddix’s cards are going for the cheap on eBay – check out this graded example here.

So there you have it, Harvey Haddix’s 13 innings of no hit perfection will go down as the greatest no no that never happened.

FlippingWax

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2 responses to “A No No… No?

  1. Pingback: Baseballbriefs.com

  2. cool story… dumb rule change though…

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